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| | |-+  Alders and inch worms
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Author Topic: Alders and inch worms  (Read 2277 times)
SpekJones
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« on: July 14, 2011, 12:09:53 PM »

So, I've been noticing this summer that some type of bug is getting into the
alders here on the lower Kenai.  This is this first summer I have seen them
show up here.  They are wide spread, in every alder patch I have inspected
from Ninilchik south.  Almost all the alder leaves have holes ate in them,
some much more than others.  I have found a lot of green inch worms on
the leaves. Heres some pic's.
This first one is of a leaf with a hole ate in it and is kinda a poor pic of the damage, most leaves are much more ate up than this:

There are a lot of leaves that are rolled up like this:

When you open them up they look like this on the inside:


Anyone seeing this up around Wasilla or Anchorage and does anyone know what kind of bug they may be?
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SpekJones
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« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2011, 10:13:12 AM »

Found out a bit more on this.  The inch worms are the larvae of the leaf roller moths.
There appears to be three slightly different species at work here in this area. The worms are pretty much targeting any bush with leaves;  alder, willow, mountain ash,
highbush cranberry, doesn't seem to matter to them.   In the caribou hills they are stripping the leaves off huge patches of willow and alder.   From what I can find these
outbreaks typically last about 3 years.  The stripping of the leaves is not always fatal
to the tree, but can't find much on that.   If the willows die from the damage it could have a big impact on moose browse here in the future.  Just estimating there is
over 50% of the willow patches that are stripped of leaves now.   Would be a good thing IMO if they killed all the alder, but not a good thing if all the willow dies off.


 
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frozen okie
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2011, 01:51:45 AM »

I seem to remember something about this in the AND paper 4-5 years ago,happened in Eagle River and Anchorage might look back and see what it said.
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SpekJones
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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2011, 10:05:03 PM »

Thanks Okie,  I'll see if I can check it out.  I think they had a problem with leaf miners
around Anc a few years ago, but these are a different critter.  Be interesting to see
if the bushes die or not.
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frozen okie
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2011, 10:40:49 AM »

Ya I don't remember what they were just remember eating leaves off trees and the greenies having a cow about it
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